flag image
Form Wealth Management
Community columnists
/datedimages/2013/02/12/d29B5EWOLHA503EC.sm.jpg
shadow
(click for larger version)

Fire destroys house and home

February 14, 2013
Thank you to The Summertime Foundation's $10,000 Matching Grant. We want to remind everyone for every dollar you donate, it will be matched by another. The middle of winter is here with its cold temperatures and long dark nights. This can be the most difficult time for our desperate fellow creations in need of our help. This also comes at the same time as our donations slow down after the holidays. Utility, shelter, food and auto assistance are crucial this time of year for our seniors, the disabled and the working poor families turning to us for help. God bless you for caring and sharing. Dear W.C.,
/datedimages/2013/02/12/d2710BkHiu9A8D3E.sm.jpg
shadow
(click for larger version)

Let's not let theater go the way of Wright hotel

February 14, 2013
'For the highest task of intelligence is to grasp and recognize genuine opportunity.' John Dewey

Recent Community columnists
‘My wife used to do these things’
A Valentine’s Day duty fulfilled despite her absence
February 07, 2013
My wife Beverly departed this life three days after Valentine’s Day 2011. I sent birthday and anniversary cards to our progeny, all 16 of them, during 2011. I sent valentines to all of them a year ago, 2012.This year I don’t know what to do, except dredge up this piece written after Valentine’s Day 2012. Maybe my editor will take pity and make a sort of “print valentine” for any reader, to say nothing about the 16 family members.
Lake Geneva was once a 'walking city'
January 24, 2013
Until the beginning of the 1960s, Lake Geneva was a “walking city.” Most citizens walked everywhere — especially to the center of the city’s life, the “downtown.” If one wanted to go to Chicago, one walked to the railroad depot on North Street just west of Broad Street.
Oral history info sought for Ceylon Count
Rare home is preserved in museum display
January 17, 2013
Editor’s Note: Do you have memories of Ceylon Court? Caryl Robers is preparing an oral history of Ceylon Court. If you have information, please send an email to Caryl Robers at carylrobers@yahoo.com. And if you want to know more about Ceylon Court, following is a slightly edited article which first appeared in May 2011 Welcome Home, which is published by the Regional News.By John Halverson
Grant sought for OWI court
January 10, 2013
We have all heard the saying that some things are both an art and a science. Well, I have just experienced a new something that falls within that realm. In a recent article, I introduced the Walworth County Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee (CJCC) program of OWI Court. With the blessing of the County Board, our OWI Court decided to apply for an expansion grant in the amount of $80,000. The grant was available from the Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance (OJA).
Childhood memories of Lake Geneva fires
January 03, 2013
It is hard to believe that color television did not always exist. It is even harder to believe that not everyone owned a black and white television, but instead listened to the radio, and only to AM radio as FM radio did not yet exist. For those who did not have a color television set or even a black and white television set, few will forget when color television was first made available to the general public in Lake Geneva.The time was the mid-1950s and the venue was Leonard’s TV store on the east side of the 500 block of Broad Street, where Amy’s Shipping Emporium is today. In the early evening a crowd began to gather in front of Leonard’s plate glass window. At 8 p.m. the large, rectangular box behind the window was turned on and a colored television program, much like a cinemascope movie, magically appeared. A murmur rose from the crowd assembled in front of Leonard’s window. They were watching a TV program in color for the first time. It was “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court,” the TV version of Mark Twain’s popular novel. For many nights thereafter, a crowd gathered in front of the window of Leonard’s TV store to watch other television programs in color.
So how about that tax bill?
January 03, 2013
I hate to end the year writing about tax bills, but I have received more calls on the subject this year than I have in a long time. For every call I get, I’m sure there are many other taxpayers with the same questions on their minds. Not every call ends on a high note, but I do find that there is a fair amount of confusion on the topic.Some taxpayers get sticker shock when they open their bills and reach for the phone before taking a closer look. When you pay your tax bill you are actually funding a number of different units of government, not just Walworth County.
Lake Geneva memories: TV, mobs and Gypsies
December 27, 2012
It is hard to believe that color television did not always exist. It is even harder to believe that not everyone owned a black and white television, but instead listened to the radio, and only to AM radio as FM radio did not yet exist. For those who did not have a color television set or even a black and white television set, few will forget when color television was first made available to the general public in Lake Geneva.The time was the mid-1950s and the venue was Leonard’s TV store on the east side of the 500 block of Broad Street, where Amy’s Shipping Emporium is today. In the early evening a crowd began to gather in front of Leonard’s plate glass window. At 8 p.m. the large, rectangular box behind the window was turned on and a colored television program, much like a cinemascope movie, magically appeared. A murmur rose from the crowd assembled in front of Leonard’s window. They were watching a TV program in color for the first time. It was “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court,” the TV version of Mark Twain’s popular novel. For many nights thereafter, a crowd gathered in front of the window of Leonard’s TV store to watch other television programs in color.
Lake Geneva's history lies buried in Pioneer Cemetery
All those interested in history should stroll among the tombstones
December 13, 2012
The year 2012 is the 175th anniversary of the establishment of the Pioneer Cemetery in Lake Geneva. Many area residents drive past Pioneer Cemetery frequently without giving a thought as to how the tombstones in the cemetery might relate to Lake Geneva’s 19th-century history. They are probably unaware that the cemetery contains graves of many people who were “players” in Lake Geneva during the 19th century.If the cemetery were kept unlocked during the daylight hours (this writer hopes that the Cemetery Commission will decide to keep it unlocked as it was during most of the 175 years that it has been in existence), all those interested in Lake Geneva’s 19th-century history could stroll among the tombstones and view the names of many of the people mentioned in James Simmons’ magnificent history, “Annals of Lake Geneva, 1835-1897.” Foremost among those who are buried in Pioneer Cemetery (beneath the largest tombstone) are Dr. Phillip Maxwell and his wife Jerusha. Dr. Maxwell was one of the seven founders of Geneva (as Lake Geneva was originally known). Maxwell’s mansion, the first mansion built on Geneva Lake (in 1856), still exists on Baker Street just west of Baker Street’s intersection with Wells Street. Maxwell Street in Lake Geneva and the more famous Maxwell Street in Chicago are both named after him.
A 'Silent' speaks out
December 06, 2012
(World War II) bred caution and sensitivity among Silent children, lending them a persona that produced a lifelong preoccupation with process, fairness and artistic expression.— from “The Fourth Turning,”William Strauss and Neil Howe
Reunions, we elders and education
"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." Williams Butler
November 29, 2012
Teachers do have favorites. One suspects they would not be human if they didn’t. The dilemma arises with the manner in which teachers integrate their recognition of student strengths with their own teaching styles rather than broadcasting to the world. Strong teachers learn, in plain words, to keep their impressions to themselves.This particular pedagogue, being in the midst of his ninth decade, would not say he has thrown caution to the winds, but it is now much easier to express myself to and about individuals who brought something special to the art of studentry (apparently I’ve coined a word, though I have used it before).This fall, I participated in a tour of the much-expanded campus facilities of Badger High School with members of the class of 1972 celebrating their 40th reunion.
Community Bank
Site Search

Your national news today
icon4 indicted in West Virginia chemical spill case
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Four former chemical company executives have been indicted on pollution charges over a January spill that triggered a ban on drinking water for days for 300,000 West Virginia residents...
iconAP source: Cuba releases US prisoner Alan Gross
WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior Obama administration official says Cuba has released American Alan Gross, who has been imprisoned for five years...
iconEx-Marines: Man who killed 6 argued with ex-wife
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Former Marines who served with a Pennsylvania man who killed his ex-wife and five of her relatives before committing suicide said he fought constantly with his wife during the time they knew him...
Regional News
LAKE GENEVA AREA REALTY
Young Auditorium
Pick up The Lake Geneva Regional News at these convenient locations