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Incumbents remain


Linn candidates reflect on April races



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DeYoung (click for larger version)
April 09, 2013 | 02:12 PM
LINN — The incumbents in the contested April 2 local races retained their seats, but both supervisor races were close.

The closest was the race for Supervisor No. 1. Incumbent Christine L. Jones beat challenger Tim Rasch by nine votes, 272-263.

"It was close," Jones said over the phone April 4. "But both of us are very well-known in the community, and both of us are trying to do our best for it."

Jones was a member of the town's first Plan Commission, which she said was established in 1991.

In the mid-90s, she became a town supervisor. Since then, Jones has been a town supervisor more years than not, having won and lost elections.

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Polyock (click for larger version)
Although this was Rasch's first election, he was the town's fire chief from 2004 to 2012.

"It was not a surprise," he said in an email Monday about the outcome of the April 2 race. "I thought it would be close, and as it turned out, it certainly was."

So what gave Jones the edge April 2?

"I have no clue," she said. "It's whatever people think. Some people think I do a good job. Some people think I don't."

However, Jones said she never talks negatively about an opponent in her campaigns.

Rasch took a more objective approach to his answer.

"I did not work hard enough," he said. "My opponent got (to) her voters a little better than I. Looking back, yard signs, etc., may have helped, but candidly, I did not do an adequate job marketing myself."

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Rasch (click for larger version)
Supervisor No. 2

Craig DeYoung beat Roy G. White 277-253.

"I think my campaign last year helped get my name out there," DeYoung said over the phone April 4. "More people know me this time around."

DeYoung sought a supervisor's spot in April 2012. He lost to Supervisor Alex Palmer. In an email Monday, White said he wasn't surprised by the outcome.

He said aside from DeYoung running before, he has lived in Linn his whole life, has a small business and is well-known.

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White
"We have been here 24 years and, with our youngest in school here (it) gave us a chance to connect with the local people somewhat," White said. "Most of the people in our close area are part-time (residents), so I didn't have a large base to draw on. Also, there was no issue that would motivate the people to vote one way or the other."

He said he could have done more "electioneering," meeting people and so on, "but that is not my nature." He said he will have to work on that.

"I do think it was a good experience and may try it again in the future," White said.

DeYoung said he hopes people elected him because they think he can help run the town in the right direction.

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He said he thinks there aren't too many problems, except for the town's valuation and finding ways to keep the town's tax rate down.

But he's looking forward to discovering what being a supervisor is all about.

"Learning how to do this job, that's first," DeYoung said. "I'm new at it. There's going to be a learning curve."

Clerk-treasurer once more

Another town incumbent who was re-elected is Clerk-Treasurer Sue Polyock. On April 2, Polyock beat challenger Rose Smith-Miller 413-158.

Attempts to obtain comments from Smith-Miller were unsuccessful by press time.

Polyock has been the town's clerk-treasurer for more than 20 years. In an email Monday, she said she couldn't remember the last time she ran opposed for re-election. "We keep copies of ballots back to 2000 and I was not contested on any of those, so it was before 2000," she said.

Polyock said she believes that town voters realized her position "is a complex one."

"The voters are my boss," she said. "I think they gave me an excellent performance review and I thank them so much for that. I am usually the very first go-to guy people call. If I cannot help them, I give them a name of someone who can." She isn't the same clerk-treasurer she was when she first ran.

"It is a lot different than when I started and I was able to grow with the responsibilities," Polyock said. "I have the education, certification and experience."

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