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Milwaukee Brewers legends highlight Grand Geneva charity event


Yount, Fingers, Vaughn, others swing for a good cause



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Former Brewers coach and current Brewers telecaster Davey Nelson was in a very good mood Monday. Mike Ramczyk.

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Greg Vaughn, who hit 355 home runs for the Brew Crew in the 1990s, is happy with his tee shot on No. 15. Mike Ramczyk. (click for larger version)
August 13, 2013 | 03:20 PM
TOWN OF LYONS — Major League Baseball Hall of Famer and Milwaukee Brewers legend Robin Yount looked a bit lost Monday afternoon at Grand Geneva Resort and Spa.

Riding along with a foursome on the Highlands Course during the 28th Swing With The Legends charity event, only the third player ever to win MVP at two positions scanned the thick-grassed embankment adjacent to the White River on No. 10 with a careful eye.

"I'm looking for our balls," Yount said. "All my guys went in the water."

After striking out on his search, Yount hopped in his cart, sped to the opposite bank of the river and eventually found a couple golf balls.

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Crisis averted.

Yount and 25 other former MLB players, mostly Brewers, attended the all-day event, which included colorful introductions, a friendly dinner and some fun afterward at Evolve, the resort's club.

According to the Swing With The Legends website, "Hall of Famers and the names you've watched play the game, come together to help children and families nationwide."

Proceeds from the event, which included a round of golf with a former player and dinner, goes to kids' organizations like Treyton's Field of Dreams and the Major League Baseball Players Association Legends for Youth.

Yount, who said he's been coming to Lake Geneva since the 1970s, loves giving back to the youth. He also enjoys seeing his former teammates like MLB Hall of Famer Rollie Fingers, Jerry Augustine, Jim Slaton, Mike Caldwell, Don Money and Charlie Moore.

"I like the camaraderie," Yount told a Regional News reporter moments after his round of golf. "It's nice getting back here. I love this area."

The 57-year-old, widely considered the best Brewers player ever, recently had left shoulder surgery, so he didn't play golf. Yount said the surgery didn't work and he will need the same procedure on the same arm. An owner in the Northwoods collegiate summer baseball league headquartered at Concordia University in Mequon, Yount said his team, the Chinooks, recently made their first playoff appearance. He is excited about the direction of the league, which helps college players work on skills during the offseason.

Yount and 26 other former major leaguers, mostly Brewers, were announced one by one before the 11:15 a.m. shotgun start. Gorman Thomas, a power hitter from the 1982 American League champion team, dazzled the small crowd with a funny strut.

Yount was announced last and received the biggest ovation. He joined the rest of the guys in a line that included Fox Sports Wisconsin telecaster Davey Nelson for a photo shoot with various media.

Average Joes got a chance to golf with a player, and spectators even brought out lawn chairs, waited at No. 10, and received autographs from just about every player on baseball bats, pictures and cards.

Greg Vaughn, who is eighth on the Brewers' all-time home run list with 355 and hit 50 in 1998 with the San Diego Padres, cheered on his fellow golfer on the par-3 No. 15. Vaughn was within 10 feet of the cup on his tee shot and then smiled and congratulated his new buddies on their putts.

After the hole, Vaughn's friendly attitude shined through.

"How you doing, man?," he said to the Regional News reporter. "You having fun?"

The reporter professed his love for Vaughn, mentioning Vaughn was his favorite player growing up.

"I should've had you with me the whole time," Vaughn said.

When asked about his trade in 1998 that sent Vaughn to San Diego, he seemed disappointed he couldn't stay with the Brewers.

"That's the business of it," he said. "There was nothing I could do."

Vaughn finished his round of 18 holes with a par on the par-4 16th hole.

No strangers to the spotlight, the former baseball greats had no problem waving to the cameras, posing for pictures with strangers and signing whatever was thrown in front of them.

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