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Obituaries

Joseph Argento Sr.

Died: Thursday, November 02, 2006
Age: 61
Joseph Argento Sr., 61, a United States Marine and Vietnam veteran, passed away suddenly on Nov. 2, 2006, at the age of 61. He endured a heart attack three years ago and had struggled with severe rheumatoid arthritis during the past six months.

He was born in Chicago on Sept. 18, 1945, to Salvatore (Sam) and the late Concetta Argento. Joe served in the United States Marines in Camp Pendleton, Calif., before serving in the Vietnam War. He also was a guest at the home of actor and singer Robert Goulet and his wife, Carol Lawrence, while in California.

Joe was the owner and proprietor of Aaron Auto Brokers for more than 25 years, operating his automobile business in Hebron, Ill., and Melrose Park, Ill. He taught his brothers and son the auto business. During this time, he also shared his expertise and talent with assisting the operation of a family owned business, Lake Como Inn. He served as a special on the Stone Park Police Department. He also was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police and the Jake LaSpisa Italian Club.

Joe was very well known and he will be remembered as a warm-hearted and compassionate individual. He was respected, loved and cherished by many, many friends. He had a special relationship with his cousin, Robert, growing up more as brothers than first cousins. His plans were to retire to Fort Myers, Fla., where he owned a home. From the time he was a child, he loved the Florida area and vacationed there often with friends and family.

He loved his family dearly and being the oldest brother (as he would always say) he adored his sisters and brothers. He was devoted to his wife, family and friends. He was deeply loved by his mother, who passed away 20 years ago on Easter Sunday at the age of 62, and buried on her 63rd birthday. His father has resided in Lake Geneva for more than 20 years.

Fifth generation was made when his grandson, Michael Anthony, was born on Oct. 17, 1997. He was the proud “papa” to his one and only grandson.

He loved life itself, enjoyed the outdoors, boating, golfing, hunting and fishing. He had a great love not only for animals, but also for the family dalmatian, Chief.

Joe participated annually in the Classic Car Rally in Lake Geneva in honor of his mother. He also enjoyed the car business and took pleasure in his love for antique and older model vehicles.

He is survived by his wife, Paula A. (nee Martinez); sister, Sandra (Martin) Ruchala; brothers, Sam Jr., and Anthony Argento; son, Joseph Jr. (Tina Gannon); nephew, Sammy; and niece Figianna (Todd) Horn.

Visitation was held at Cumberland Funeral Chapels, Norridge, Ill. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Nov. 6, 2006, at Sacred Heart Church in Melrose Park, Ill. As part of the service, a memorial with the Marine Corps, taps and a 21-gun salute was part of the celebration of life for Joe. Also, his sister, has preserved a guest book in memory of Joe, which can be viewed at www.suntimes.com for Nov. 4 and 5. Condolences may be left on the line.

The family has asked that when you see a rose, remember Joe with a smile. He always had that happy smile and will be remembered as a very warm, caring and respected individual. Loved by all, he has left emptiness in the hearts of many and will be deeply missed.



A memorial Mass will be held in Lake Geneva in honor of Joe at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 6, 2007, at St. Francis De Sales Catholic Church.

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