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C. Pauline "Polly" Culp

Died: Friday, August 09, 2013
Age: 86
C. Pauline “Polly” Culp, 86, a longtime resident of Lake Geneva, died Friday, Aug. 9, 2013 at Arbor Village in Lake Geneva.

The former C. Pauline Steinhilber was born in Indianapolis, Ind., on Nov. 23, 1926, the daughter of the late Paul and Minnie Ryan Steinhilber. She graduated from Broad Ripple High School in Indianapolis and then from Hanover College in Indiana with a Bachelor of Arts in English. On Nov. 17, 1951, in Indianapolis, she married Gaylord M. Culp. He preceded her in death on Jan. 28, 2003. She was a longtime member of the AAUW.

Polly is survived by three children, James (Anne) Culp, Franklin, Katherine Culp, Elkhorn and Timothy Culp, Waterford; four grandsons, Eric Culp, Geoffrey Culp, Jay (Courtney) Culp and Tyler Culp; three granddaughters, Lindsey Olson, Lorna Olson and Chynna Culp; and two great-grandchildren, Natalie Anne Culp and Michael David Lee Culp.

Services Friday, Sept. 6, at 1 p.m., at Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, with the Rev. Mark Moller-Gunderson officiating. Visitation Friday from noon to the time of services at Derrick Funeral Home and Cremation Services in Lake Geneva. To sign the online guest registry, go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.

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LAKE GENEVA AREA REALTY
Born September 3rd
1856: Louis H. Sullivan, architect who gained fame for his design of the Chicago Auditorium Theater.
1875: Ferdinand Porsche, automotive engineer, designer of the Volkswagen in 1934 and the Porsche sports car in 1950.
1894: Richard Niebuhr, theologian.
1907: Carl Anderson, physicist and 1936 Nobel prize winner for his discovery of the positron.
1914: Dixie Lee Ray, Chair of the Atomic Energy Commission who received the U.N. Peace Prize in 1977.
September 3rd
in history
1650: The English under Cromwell defeat a superior Scottish army under David Leslie at the Battle of Dunbar.
1777: The American flag (stars & stripes), approved by Congress on June 14th, is carried into battle for the first time by a force under General William Maxwell.
1783: The Treaty of Paris is signed by Great Britain and the new United States, formally bringing the American Revolution to an end.
1838: Frederick Douglass escapes slavery disguised as a sailor. He would later write The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, his memoirs about slave life. At Douglass' home in Washington, D.C., visitors can learn about his successes--and his disappointments.
1855: General William Harney defeats Little Thunder's Brule Sioux at the Battle of Blue Water in Nebraska.